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If Women Really Want To Practice Self-Love, They Need To Stop Saying This One Word

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Women Shouldn’t Say Sorry For Their Emotions If They Want Self Love & Self Care
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Self, Health And Wellness

Remove it from your vocabulary.

"I'm so sorry. I'm just emotional / hormonal/ worked up / insert unreasonable display of emotion here."

I have a monthly dinner party for women in my community. We eat, laugh, cry, brag and share — with one rule: no apologizing.

Unless one of us intentionally hurts someone (not possible with these beautiful, fierce, loving women) no one is allowed to say, "I'm sorry"

RELATED: 10 Things Strong Women Should Never Apologize For (Ever!)

Maybe it's because we have been told that our emotions are too much. Maybe it's because we don't know how to unapologetically take up space. Maybe it's because we don't know how to show emotion without blaming it on someone else.

But women say ‘sorry’ a lot, and I'm out to change that. I want to move women empowerment forward by making women understand that it’s ok to express their emotions.

Before you roll your eyes, take stock. How many times a day do you apologize? How many times do you dismiss emotion?

There is nothing more beautiful, graceful, and confusing than a woman showing, and owning her emotions and feelings. Whether that be excitement, tears, anger or frustration. It's beautiful.

And so often we condition ourselves, our daughters, and our friends that being emotional is not acceptable.

RELATED: I Am So Done Saying "I'm Sorry" And You Should Be, Too

Instead, how should we be? Overthinking, over-calculating, manipulating, and controlled? These are all masculine traits.

And while masculine energy is enigmatic and entrancing and has a place in getting things done, for most women masculine energy is how we think we should be.

I know a woman I'll call Christine. She's gorgeous, funny, passionate and has, like most of us been through a lot. She's built a six-figure business around spirituality and is crushing it.

And yet, when she cries her whole face contorts as she tried to hold it in. Past domestic abuse trauma, growing up around boys, and thinking that there's some way that she needs to be as a business woman she apologizes for crying.

"No apologizing" I remind her.

And her face contorts. She looks angry. Her whole body tenses as she tries (unsuccessfully) to not cry again. Still, this woman is an inspiration. Sometimes, the most wounded bird is the one who can make the biggest difference.

RELATED: 11 Big Lessons Only Men Who Love Feminist Women Will Understand

"What do you need right now?" I ask.

As you learn about me, it's a question I ask a lot of of people until they remember to ask themselves.

"Space," she says, and her face starts to soften.

"What does that mean to you?" I ask.

"I need to lean back. I need to pray more. I need to laugh more. I need to window shop with no destination," she replies.

By the end of the next week, she has done all of those things.

And here's what happened in her life as she continued doing them over time:

RELATED: The Real Reasons So Many Women Are Filled With Rage (And Why Nobody Should Be Shocked By It)

She and her husband started talking to each other more

She learned how to make requests without automatically starting a fight

She learned to schedule time for herself in the morning, in the afternoon and again before going to bed

She softened emotionally

She lost 30 pounds

She nearly doubled her business within approximately six months

This week, make a commitment to yourself that you'll stop and take moment to notice how many times you apologize unnecessarily.

Don't try to change anything you're doing. Just take notice.

Then, deep down in that heart of yours, ask yourself what is that you really need — and make it happen.

RELATED: What Self-Love Really Means (Because It's Way More Than Just Putting Yourself First)

Megan Riley is a relationship coach, sex coach, and psychic who helps empower women to be their best selves. For more of her content on how to heal and thrive, visit her website

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